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Kenley Jansen feels Dodgers are ‘true champions’ of 2017

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He also says he won’t throw at any Astros players

2017 Major League Baseball World Series Game Six: Houston Astros v. Los Angeles Dodgers

Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen called in as a guest earlier this week on “The Sedano Show”, and had some interesting things to say in regards to the Houston Astros and the World Series from 2017.

As you all know, a lot came out about how the Astros were cheating during the 2017 season and how it likely impacted them winning a championship as a result. Well, Jansen didn’t hold back about how he felt about that, saying that the Dodgers should have been the ones hoisting that World Series trophy at Dodger Stadium.

“I feel like we are the true champions in 2017. It should be us, we got cheated.” Jansen said.

A lot of current Dodgers players who were on that 2017 team have been vocal on getting cheated out of a World Series, Jansen is just the next in line to express his frustration and anger on the issue.

Things will sure get interesting soon, because the Dodgers are expected to play the Astros this season. Initially they weren’t, but because of this brand new season, the Dodgers will face A.L. West teams along with N.L. West teams. This will be the first time both teams have faced each other since Game 7 at Dodger Stadium.

Though a lot of pitchers potentially have things in mind for when they face Astros hitters, Jansen has no intentions of throwing at them.

“But if we’re going to play them this year, just beat them, man. I’m not going to throw at guys, or whatever. ... I don’t wish anybody to do that, to throw at people. Just play them and try to be at my best.”

It definitely will be interesting to see what happens when the Dodgers and Astros face each other this season. Though it might not come from Jansen, I wouldn’t be shocked if there are one or two pitches that get away from Dodgers pitchers.

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I actually believe it’s the Dodgers, even though one could argue a team this thoroughly talented might be more vulnerable with a smaller sample size. Their depth might be more important in this 60-game season than it would in a typical 162-game campaign. Their pitching depth will help them navigate a short spring training, their position-player depth will grant them far more designated hitter options than any other National League team and their overall depth will help combat a season when a multitude of players might be sidelined with positive COVID-19 tests